Blue-and-white Portuguese-style folk art for Cabinet Doors

BLUE AND WHITE is a popular color combination, and is often prominent in crockery and ceramics. The famous Willow pattern, based on Oriental chinoiserie designs, Delft tiles and ceramics from Holland, Spode china, and traditional Mediterranean pottery have all made use of this attractive pairing of colors.

Here we apply the crisp simplicity of blue and white to the kitchen, developing a design based upon an original piece of Portuguese pottery painted in a folk art style.

MATERIALS AND TOOLS

1. PREPARATION
This technique lends itself
to solid wood doors with
central panels. but it can also be applied to melamine,
laminate, vinyl, and fiberboard doors. Prepare the surface following the
instructions on pages
6-9. Apply two coats of
white matte latex paint,
allowing the first coat to dry
before applying the second.
Sand between coats using
fine-grade sandpaper on a
wooden door only. With a
varnish brush, apply one coat of matte acrylic varnish.

 

Tracing the Design

2. TRACING THE DESIGN
Choose a  blue-and-white ceramic design.

On a piece of transfer paper, trace the main part of the design, chosen  design’s main section shows a collection of flowers and leaves.

If the design needs to be elongated in order to fit the central pane parts of it can be repeated.

 

 

TRANSFERRING THE DESIGN

3. TRANSFERRING THE DESIGN
Turn the transfer paper over and center it on the door panel, holding it in place with some masking tape. Using a sharp pencil, draw over each traced line, transferring the design onto me door.

DESIGNING THE BORDER

4. DESIGNING THE BORDER
Select a detail from the original design that can be repeated as a border. Trace and transfer this design as before, around the border of the door. Alternatively, draw a border freehand, or paint a simple thin line using two lines of low-tack painters’ tape as a guide.

5. MIXING THE PAINT
Mix some cobalt blue and ultramarine blue artists’ acrylic paint together in two separate jam jars.

 

 

 

 

Add different amounts of white artists’ acrylic paint to each jar, creating a mid-tone blue and a darker shade of blue.

TRADE SECRETS: Use loose brushstrokes to paint in the less intricate parts of the design, holding the brush handle anywhere from the middle to the tip for greater ease oj movement. This will result in a “folk art” painting style. For the more detailed
portions of the design, hold the brush handle closer to the bristles to achieve greater control.

MIXING THE PAINT | PAINTING THE DESIGN

Add a little acrylic glazing liquid and water to both mixtures until they are the consistency of light cream.

6. PAINTING THE DESIGN
Using a medium artists’ sable brush, paint in the design with the mid-toned blue; use
the original design as a guide. Paint using short, rounded, brushstrokes for a folk art look. When dry, take up some dark blue on the fine artists’ sable brush and paint in the shadows and details. Paint the border pattern in the same way.

 

7. ADDING DECORATIVE DETAIL

Take up some of the dark blue on the fine sable brush and hold the loaded paintbrush at a slight angle to the edge of the raised panel or molding. Run the brush along the  molding to create a thin line. Mix a pale wash by adding more water to the mid-tone blue paint, then
use the medium artists’ sable brush to paint this wash along the molding. Allow to dry  thoroughly.

8. FINISHING
Apply three coats of matte acrylic varnish, allowing each to dry thoroughly before applying the next. Take up some blue-tinted wax polish on a lint-free cloth and apply its edges and corners of the panel and border to create area soft shading.

For more information and decorating ideas from Henny Donovan please visit a http://www.hennydonovanmotif.co.uk. You also can find The Painted Kitchen Book on Google.

 

This entry was posted in Finishing Techniques, Kitchen Remodeling, Refacing Kitchen Cabinets. Bookmark the permalink.

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